Does CTE Qualify for Medical Marijuana in Ohio?

With the passage of Ohio House Bill 523, a total of 21 medical conditions were approved for medical cannabis treatment in Ohio. CTE's inclusion makes Ohio the only state in the country to explicitly include CTE as a qualifying condition for medical cannabis treatment. 

There is still a significant lack of information regarding CTE as there were fewer than 50 confirmed cases between 1928 and 2004, however, developments are being made rapidly due to the work of Boston University, the Concussion Legacy Foundation and the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs partnering to form the VA-BU-CLF Brain Bank. The Brain Bank has expanded our understanding of CTE with over 500 donated brains that have allowed researchers to study the condition like never before.

 

How Can Medical Marijuana Help CTE Symptoms?

Although there are few confirmed diagnoses as diagnosis most often takes place after death, researchers are finding that CTE is present in high school and college graduate athletes that are no longer playing sports - meaning this condition may be more widespread than many might believe.

Symptoms of CTE might include but are not limited to:

  • Impulsive Behavior

  • Short-term Memory Loss

  • Chronic Headaches and Migraines

  • Cognitive Impairment or Difficulty Thinking

  • Apathy or Depression

  • Focusing and Vision Problems

  • Aggression & Irritability

Additionally, researchers believe CTE causes atrophy,  in which parts of the brain waste away over time as injuries to the portion of nerve cells impact cell communication. For this reason, individuals with CTE have potential to show signs and symptoms of other neurodegenerative diseases including ALS and Alzheimer's, among others.

Many of the symptoms listed above are connected to the endocannabinoid system, the largest neurotransmitter system in your body. When THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids interact with the endocannabinoid system there are therapeutic effects as a result. Although the research is limited, there is research that shows cannabinoids demonstrate they could reduce the brain's oxidative stress following a traumatic brain injury; also working as a neuroprotectant, reducing neurological impairment and swelling. 

Additionally, the U.S. Department of Health filed a patent asserting CBD is a neuroprotective antioxidant, confirming cannabinoids can prevent brain trauma damage. A Canadian study found cannabinoids can reduce depressive and anxious behavior as well as stimulating neuron growth in rats.

There are a number of different strains and forms of cannabis that can be utilized in the treatment of CTE. Using cannabinoids and terpenes as a guide to address your specific conditions will allow you to get the most out of your treatment, in addition to using the appropriate forms for you and your lifestyle.

3 Easy Steps

Step 1

Schedule an appointment with one of our friendly marijuana doctors at any location throughout the State! 

Step 2

Visit our office for your

in-person evaluation with a state-certified medical marijuana doctor.

Step 3

With the doctor's approval, you'll receive your card via email from the Ohio Board of Pharmacy.

What is CTE?

According to the Boston University CTE Center, CTE is a degenerative brain disease found in athletes, military veterans, and others with a history of repetitive brain trauma. CTE has been seen in individuals as young as 17 tears old, although symptoms generally don't begin appearing until years after the head impacts.

The early symptoms usually appear in patients in their late 20s and 30s, ultimately affecting the individual's mood and behavior. As the disease progresses, many patients experience problems with thinking, focus, and memory, with cognitive symptoms developing later than mood and behavioral symptoms, usually around the patient's 40s or 50s.